The Age of Access: The New Culture of Hypercapitalism, Where all of Life is a Paid-For Experience Review

The Age of Access: The New Culture of Hypercapitalism, Where all of Life is a Paid-For Experience
Average Reviews:

(More customer reviews)
Are you looking to buy The Age of Access: The New Culture of Hypercapitalism, Where all of Life is a Paid-For Experience? Here is the right place to find the great deals. we can offer discounts of up to 90% on The Age of Access: The New Culture of Hypercapitalism, Where all of Life is a Paid-For Experience. Check out the link below:

>> Click Here to See Compare Prices and Get the Best Offers

The Age of Access: The New Culture of Hypercapitalism, Where all of Life is a Paid-For Experience ReviewMake no mistake, I think that the Age of Access is an outstanding analysis of modern economy.
If you are a young professional and trying to develop a plan for professional development, or if you are a seasoned professional trying to come to terms with the mindset of the young, you should definitely read this book.
The biggest intellectual challenge that exists today for professionals is to understand the "new economy." I am always afraid that tidal waves of disruptive changes are right around the corner (or are already here) that could literally destroy my company or my career. Rifkin elaborates on several modern economic paradigms, and his analysis will help you anticipate and prepare for these fantastic changes.
I agree with some of the gloomy predictions like the destruction of our "Cultural Landscape."In a very vivid example, Rifkin mentions that there is a Dunkin' Donuts just a few yards away from the Trevi fountain in Rome. Even as a self described libertarian, I believe this kind of pollution of the "Cultural Landscape" should be stopped.
Rifkin's elaboration on the economic value of social trust is right on.Nevertheless his implication that trust is withering away in the US is not convincing.
My criticism is that although Rifkin has clearly diagnosed many of societies ills, he falls short of offering an action-based specific resolution. He seems to imply that "a handful of giant transnational life-science companies" represent the evil empire of today, nevertheless he does not say how to undo their influence.
Reading between the lines, it seems that Rifkin is implying that government ought to take control of certain things that are now considered private property.As an example, government would force Dunkin Donuts to move their restaurant to a less sacred location. History shows us that expanding the power of government can have disastrous results. I would have respected the author much more if he would provide a naked description of his action plan.The Age of Access: The New Culture of Hypercapitalism, Where all of Life is a Paid-For Experience Overview

Want to learn more information about The Age of Access: The New Culture of Hypercapitalism, Where all of Life is a Paid-For Experience?

>> Click Here to See All Customer Reviews & Ratings Now

0 comments:

Post a Comment